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It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas: A review of Bath’s hidden Alpine Lodge

Our Lifestyle Editor Emily was invited to The Bird hotel at the bottom of Bathwick Hill to check out their Christmas Lodge. Here’s how she got on…

If you haven’t already noticed The Bird from your daily bus commute to campus, their huge display of Christmas lights and decorations will attract your attention! New this year, The Bird has a hidden treat nestled in between the hotel and the Rec just behind it… their very own Alpine Lodge! I must say that the cosy lodge was very festive as it is full of decorations and all things Christmassy. The main restaurant called Plate, is full of colour too, with the ceiling covered in a sea of Christmas baubles!

We tried a few cocktails from their bird-themed cocktail menu, which is available in the main restaurant as well as this Alpine Lodge. The Passionfruit Martini and Kingfisher, as well as their take on an espresso martini; the Tonka Bonkas, are just a few of their quirky cocktails served all year round. 

They have a small selection of nibbles which are exclusive to the Lodge, including a delicious filo-wrapped Bath soft cheese with sourdough which is like a baked camembert – yum! We also tried the sage and chestnut sausage puff, beef croquettes, and Kalamata olives.

While the Lodge will get busier as we get closer to Christmas, as well as on the weekends, this is a nice find to add to the list of Christmas things to do in Bath this year. I recommend going for a glass of mulled wine or some nibbles when it gets dark this December, for a festive vibe right in town! 

Take a look at their website here: https://www.thebirdbath.co.uk/food-drink/alpine-lodge/ 

Emily Godon

Emily is our Lifestyle Editor and a final year Politics and International Relations student. She was formerly Features Editor (2019/20). If you want to talk all things music, food and movies, get in touch with her!

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